Delidding has become extremely common within the Overclocking community for Intel processors. Delidding a processor involves removing the lid and replacing the thermal paste. After that reapplying silicone to seal the lid. I have purchased Rockit’s Delid Tool to make sure the process is simple and smooth. Intel is known for putting somewhat cheap thermals within the processor themselves, causing the transfer of heat to be mediocre on high end processors.

Products needed:

 

 

Remove your processor and insert into the delid tool. Be sure to make sure the triangles match the bottom left of your processor.

 

Then place the lid of the Rockit Tool on top, and screw the screws down.

 

Twist your alan key screw slowly. It will be firm to turn and you will feel a sudden pop. Once the pop is felt, unscrew the bolt and remove the lid!

 

Tape off the edges of the die as seen in the image. This is to ensure no liquid gets on the processor itself during this process. Be sure to clean all therm grease from the die and lid itself with 91% alcohol. There are scraping tools provided to scrape off any left over silicon.

 

Apply a somewhat generous amount of Coollaboratory Liquid Ultra Thermal Paste to the die itself, spreading it around with your mini brush. Some Delid setups put this thermal paste on the lid, I chose not to.

 

After your lid and processor are completely CLEAN. Remove the tape and get your silicone ready for application to the lid itself. When applying the silicone to the lid, do not be afraid to spill some and be sure to LEAVE A GAP. Gases will form with no gap and eventually expand the lid. DO NOT SEAL THE LID.

 

Be sure to clean any excess silicone. Once clean go ahead reapply your lid to the Rockit Tool.

 

The rockit Tool comes with a clamp that allows you to clamp the lid for cure time. I do not have the lid so i did not use it. I let the Silicone cure for 2 hours. Install your processor and you’re good to go! This delid on this 7700k yielded me about -7c difference. Some may say its not worth it, but when you’re trying to squeeze out the most of your processor for overclocking, it is more than worth it.

 

 

 

 

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